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Our research

Jump to: FWI projects · Co-badged projects · Past projects

The Future Water Institute has four intersecting research areas that are approached in a transdicsiplinary and integrated manner. There are linkages between all four research areas but the "addressing diverse relations and values around water" research area underpins all research.

 

FWI projects

  • Bridging the Water: co-create to learn & experience

    Funder: Nuffic - OKP-ICP-SAF-103136

    Duration: 2019-2021

    Team: Kevin Winter

  • Johannesburg Regional Stormwater Attenuation

    Funder: City of Johannesburg / Johannesburg Roads Agency (Aurecon contract)

    Duration: 2019

    Team: Neil Armitage

  • Liveable Neighbourhoods

    Liveable neighbourhoods with water as foremost priority: Redesigning an existing neighbourhood using Water Sensitive Design (WSD)

    While research on individual WSD technologies in South Africa has now achieved a level of maturation, there is still a need for contextually-relevant investigations that integrate engineering and ecological insights with detailed urban and architectural design investigations. This project is a WRC-funded collaboration between Architecture, Anthropology, Social Sciences, Civil Engineering and Bioprocess Engineering, with advisors from Landscape Architecture and beyond. We would like, in realistic ways, to engage with these cultural barriers by working closely with residents and property developers in an existing neighbourhood.

    Read more.

     

  • Pathways to water-resilient South African cities (PaWS)

    Funder: DANIDA Strategic sector collaboration program Phase 2

    Duration: 2019-2020

    Team: Kirsty Carden, Neil Armitage, John Okedi, Kevin Winter, Jessica Fell, Abrams

  • Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers (PICP) for South Africa - guidelines for design, installation and maintenance

    Funder: PICP industry partners

    Duration: 2019

    Team: Neil Armitage

  • Towards a water-sensitive City of Cape Town

    Funder: Western Cape Government

    Duration: 2020-2021

    Team: Kirsty Carden, Neil Armitage, Kevin Winter

  • Urban stormwater pollution into Knysna Estuary

    Funder: Knysna Municipality

    Duration: 2018-2020

    Team: Neil Armitage

  • Urban stormwater pollution into Zandvlei

    Duration: 2019

    Team: Neil Armitage

  • Using biofiltration cells for runoff treatment and urban food production: a test case

    Funder: Royal Society International collaboration

    Duration: 2018-2020

    Kevin Winter, Kirsty Carden, Robert Huddy, Jessica Fell

     

  • Waste Food-Energy-Water Urban Living Lab

    Funder: Belmont Forum Sustainable Urbanisation Global Initiative

    Duration: 2019-2020

    Team: Kevin Winter

  • Water and Fire: Enhancing capacity and reducing risk

    Funder: UKRI GCRF - Equitable Resilience

    Duration: 2020-2021

    Team: Kirsty Carden, Amber Abrams?

  • Water Sensitive Design

    Historically, water systems have been developed using a linear design approach, i.e. source, treat, transport, distribute, collect, treat and dispose. This technologically-driven and resource-intensive approach is removed from the citizens it serves, resulting in technocratic solutions and the fragmentation of the management of the urban water cycle. Water sensitive settlements require a cyclical, systems approach which, in simple terms, assumes that everything in the world is connected.

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  • UKRI GCRF Water and Fire

    UKRI GCRF Water and Fire is a collaborative, interdisciplinary project which aims to work with local knowledge to better understand community and individual responses to climate-change induced crises in the Cape Flats area of South Africa. Funded by the UKRI GCRF, it involves a partnership between the University of Stirling, the Sustainable Livelihoods Foundation, the University of Cape Town, the University of the Western Cape.

    Read more.

    Funder: UKRI GCRF

    Team: Kirsty Carden and Amber Abrams

 

Co-badged projects

  • A nature inspired approach for producing bio-cements from urine

    Funder: Water Research Commission

    Duration: 2017-2019

    Team: Dyllon Randall

  • Development and management of a Water Sensitive Design Community of Practice programme (Phase 1)

    Funder: Water Research Commission

    Duration: 2014-2018

    Team: Kirsty Carden

  • Development of a novel fertilizer-producing urinal

    Funder: National Research Foundation

    Duration: 2019-2021

    Team: Dyllon Randall

  • Evaluation of Resource recovery Alternatives in South African water trEatment systems (ERASE)

    Funder: DANIDA Strategic sector collaboration program Phase 2

    Duration: 2019-2021

    Team: David Ikumi, George Ekama

  • Optimizing the HDS process for maximum value recovery from AMD

    Funder: Water Research Commission

    Duration: 2018-2021

    Team: Jennifer Broadhurst

  • Re-thinking sanitation by upcycling urine for societal and economic benefit

    Funder: FLAIR

    Duration: 2020-2021

    Team: Dyllon Randall

  • Refinement of the world's first fertilizer-producing urinal

    This project considers sanitation as an industrial ecosystem, with the raw materials available to contribute to the bioeconomy. The concept of the bioeconomy has been developing alongside similar sustainability-driven concepts such as cleaner production, eco-industrial parks and the circular economy. The research presents an argument to consider different approaches to sanitation, which includes source separation of streams, necessary infrastructure and contribution to the bioeconomy.

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  • Resilient Futures

    This project investigates whether fibre-rich biomass can be used to remediate degraded land in a way that is economically feasible, leading to enhanced economic complexity, the establishment of a fibre micro-industry, higher value-add in output and job creation. To do this, several environmental, chemical processing, economic and legal questions need to be answered.

    Read more.

  • The Pulp and Paper Wastewater Biorefinery – potential for concomitant value recovery and wastewater treatment

    Funder: Water Research Commission

    Duration: 2017-2021

    Team: Sue Harrison

  • Turning municipal sludge beds into bio-power plants using sediment microbial fuel cells

    Funder: Water Research Commission

    Duration: 2017-2019

    Team: Dyllon Randall

  • Viability of stormwater ponds as water resources in Cape Town

    Funder: Water Research Commission

    Duration: 2016-2019

    Team: Neil Armitage, John Okedi

  • Johannesburg Regional Stormwater Attenuation

    Funder: City of Johannesburg / Johannesburg Roads Agency (Aurecon contract)

    Duration: 2019

    Team: Neil Armitage

 

Past projects

  • Peak P (Phosphorus recovery from urine)

    Urine is a major source of phosphorus. It makes up less than 1% of domestic wastewater by volume, but it contains about 80% of the nitrogen, 56% of the phosphorus and 63% of the potassium of this wastewater. The University of Cape Town is doing research on how best to recover urine so that the phosphorus within it can be extracted (thereby reducing pollution of our water bodies) and use for other purposes.

    Read more.

     

     

  • SALGA - Municipality study

    FWI has undertaken a study on how two local municipalities in the Western Cape are (inter alia) handling their water shortages. Together with the South African Local Government Association, we identified two municipalities for the purposes of this study, namely: (1) Kannaland (resource-challenged institution and water scarce area) and; (2) Swartland (well-resourced institution and water scarce area).

  • Wastewater Biorefineries

    Wastewater biorefineries (WWBR) are a response to the push towards resource recovery and the challenges encountered in that approach, while being concerned for the source of raw materials to supply the emerging bioeconomy.

    Read more.

  • Water Hub

    The Water Hub is a partnership between FWI, Stellenbosch Municipality and the Western Cape government, and is located at an abandoned water treatment facility in Franschhoek. Focused on research, demonstration, training and recreation, it is the first of its kind to demonstrate state-of-the-art techniques and technologies suitable for the African context. 

    Read more.

     

     

     

 

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